Friday, July 25, 2008

Death penalty for bloggers in Iran

Remind me not to travel to Iran.

A few weeks ago, the Islamic Parliament in Iran approved a draft law which shocked the country and is at the center of current debate.

The draft law is asking for expanded sentencing for those who publish atheistic articles and pornographic materials, or articles about rap, sex slave exports, banditry, prostitution, depravity, and kidnapping.

According to this draft, which was approved for faster review by the majority of Majlis [Iranian members of Parliament], the death sentence could be used against bloggers, journalists, artists, and intellectuals who can be easily falsely accused and convicted by intelligence services or the judiciary branch for publishing "articles against Islam."

Source: Death penalty for bloggers in Iran - The Seminal :: Independent Media and Politics

Iran intends to execute Atheist bloggers? I read things like this and scratch my head. Here in America this is not possible. Can it be so bad elsewhere? It is so easy to forget that the freedoms we enjoy are not shared by the rest of the world. Iran needs a revolution. One the overthrows its archaic theocracy.

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5 comments:

bugsoup said...

They are clearly a religion of peace. :eyeroll:

Db0 said...

Iran has already had 2 revolutions. Check the documentary "The last Shah"

Unfortunately it is partly due to "western world" Imperialistic meandering that situation is like it is.

Mojoey said...

db0 - I'm actually old enough to remember.

Db0 said...

Really? You don't look a day over 30 to me :P

In any case, one may be old but it is conceivable that they do not aware of a specific event. So many people still don't know about the Rwandan Genocide of the 90s so I'm never surprised :)

Anyway, Iran already had a revolution and people did not really go with it. Unfortunately it must be the people that want to escape theocracy in order for a revolution to happen.

DromedaryHump said...

db0, i agree.

When a significant enough portion of the population of Iran, or any country with an oppressive regime, have had enough and feel that regime no longer represents their best interests and values they will act.

Until then I subscribe to H.L Mencken's perspective:
"People deserve the government they get, and they deserve to get it good and hard."